Checking and Monitoring Steam Traps

A simple program of checking steam traps to ensure they operate adequately can save significant amounts of energy. In a system where the steam traps have not been maintained for 3 to 5 years, 15–30% of steam traps may be malfunctioning, leading to loss of steam to condensate return line. In systems with a regularly scheduled maintenance program, leaking traps should account for less than 5% of the trap population.  Further savings can be realized by attaching automated monitors to steam traps in conjunction with a maintenance program can save even more energy, without significant addition in costs.

Development Status Products
Commercial

Checking and Monitoring Steam TrapsCosts & Benefits

Parent Process: Cross Cutting Technology
Energy Savings Potential

Energy savings for a regular system of steam trap checks and follow-up maintenance is estimated to be up to 10%

CO2 Emission Reduction Potential
Costs

Using automatic monitoring it is estimated that an additional 5% cost over steam trap maintenance can be saved, with a payback time of 9 months.

Checking and Monitoring Steam Traps Publications

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) energy guide, Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry, discusses energy efficiency practices and technologies that can be implemented in iron and steel manufacturing plants. This guide provides current real world examples of iron and steel plants saving energy and reducing cost and carbon dioxide emissions.

Page Number: 

52