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Efficiency and Optimization of Pumps and Pump Systems

Pumps – which are used to pressurize and circulate water, processing chemicals and pulping slurries – account for a substantial share of motor-driven systems in a pulp and paper mill (around 30% in the US). Consequently, significant energy savings can be linked to optimizing pumps and pump systems and improving their efficiency in a mill.

Aside from reducing use, there are two main ways to increase pump system efficiency. These include reducing the friction in dynamic pump systems (not applicable to static or "lifting" systems) or upgrading/adjusting the system so that it draws closer to the best efficiency point on the pump curve. Correct sizing of pipes, surface coating or polishing and ASDs, for example, may reduce the friction loss, increasing energy efficiency. Correctly sizing the pump and choosing the most efficient pump for the applicable system will push the system closer to the best efficiency point on the pump curve (Kramer et al., 2009. p.66 - 72).

More information on this topic can be found on the Pump Systems section of the IETD.

Development Status Products
Commercial

Efficiency and Optimization of Pumps and Pump SystemsCosts & Benefits

Parent Process:
Energy Savings Potential

The installation of newer, higher-efficiency pumps typically leads to pump system energy savings of 2% to 10% (Kramer et al., 2009. p.68)

Optimization of design of pump systems have shown energy savings up to 10 to 17% (Kramer et al., 2009. p.68).

US flag US DOE estimates that with basic pump system improvements 6 300 GWh of electricity can be saved in Pulp and Paper mills of the US (Kramer <em>et al.</em>, 2009. p.66).

CO2 Emission Reduction Potential
Costs

Energy savings at the mill were achieved with an investment cost of $123,500. The payback period was 17 months.

Efficiency and Optimization of Pumps and Pump Systems Publications

Page Number: 

66-72