Efficiency Level Characteristics - Pump Systems

In the UNIDO (2010) report covering energy efficiency and cost implications of different measures for pump systems, Low, Medium and High Efficiency base cases are defined with having the following characteristics:

No LOW Efficiency Base Case Scenario
1 Few pumping systems have ever been assessed for system energy efficiency
2 Maintenance is limited to what is required to support operations
3 Flow is typically controlled by throttling or bypass  
4 Flow in excess of actual system needs is common  
5 Variable speed drives are not commonly used  
6 Motors of all sizes are routinely rewound multiple times instead of replaced  
7 5% or less of the installed motors are high efficiency--either EPAct or EFF1 equivalent

No MEDIUM Efficiency Base Case Scenario
1 15% of pumping systems have been assessed for system energy efficiency  
2 Maintenance is a routine part of operations and includes some preventative actions  
3 System operators take steps to avoid controlling flow via throttling or bypass  
4 Efforts are taken to efficiently match supply with demand  
5 Variable speed drives are proposed as a solution for flow control  
6 Motors > 37 kW are typically rewound multiple times, while smaller motors may be replaced  
7 ~25% of the installed motors are high efficiency--either EPAct or EFF1 equivalent  

No HIGH Efficiency Base Case Scenario  
1 ~30% pumping systems have been assessed for system energy efficiency  
2 Both routine and predictive maintenance are commonly practiced  
3 Flow is not controlled by throttling or bypass except in emergencies  
4 Fluid is only pumped where and when needed to meet demand  
5 Variable speed drives are one of several flow control strategies commonly applied to increase system efficiency  
6 Most facilities have a written rewind/replace policy that prohibits rewinding smaller motors (typ <37 kW)
7 50% or more of the installed motors are high efficiency--either EPAct or EFF1 equivalent