Engineered Refractories

Refractories in EAF have to withstand extreme conditions such as temperatures over 1600°C, oxidation, thermal shock, erosion, and corrosion. These extreme conditions generally lead to an undesired wear of refractories. Specially engineered refractories can be provided by a controlled microstructure: alumina particles and mullite microballoons coated uniformly with carbon and carbides. The refractories can be either sintered or cast and can therefore be used in a wide range of components at EAF mills. These refractories can reduce ladle leakages and the formation of slags in transfer operations (Worrell et al., 2010. p. 93). 

In principle use of engineered refractories have a high application potential for China, India and the US.  However, in most cases, the EAF suppliers use the best available and cost effective materials for their design. 

Development Status Products
Commercial

Engineered RefractoriesCosts & Benefits

Parent Process: Electric Arc Furnace
Energy Savings Potential

Savings of 11kWh/-steel are expected by applying this technology.

CO2 Emission Reduction Potential

Energy savings will result in reduced emissions.

Costs

Engineered Refractories Publications

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) energy guide, Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry, discusses energy efficiency practices and technologies that can be implemented in iron and steel manufacturing plants. This guide provides current real world examples of iron and steel plants saving energy and reducing cost and carbon dioxide emissions.

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