High-Efficiency Motors

Motor efficiency is determined by two main factors: the size of the motor and its efficiency quality. While for the smaller motors the size is the predominant factor affecting efficinecy, for the larger motors efficiency classes becomes more important (IEA, 2011, p. 23).  

Standard AC squirrel‐cage induction motors are the most commonly used motor types industry and offer an effective way of continuously operating pumps, fans, compressors and conveyors, etc. at fixed speed. For the medium sized AC induction motors, efficiency standards are available and currently divide the motors into three categories, namely: standard efficiency (IE1); High efficiency (IE2), and; Premium efficiency (IE3).  Introduction of a new Super Premium class (IE4), that will be 15% more efficien than IE3 type motors are indicated to stimulate competition. Information about performances of motors in different efficiency classes can be derived from the following graph.  

High efficiency motors reduce energy losses through improved design, better materials, tighter tolerances, and improved manufacturing techniques. With proper installation,
energy-efficient motors can also run cooler and have higher service factors, longer bearing life, longer insulation life, and less vibration (Worrell et al.2008, p. 38). These motors are about 85 – 96% efficient, depending on size. Premium efficiency motors are the most energy efficient motors widely available today (IEA, 2007. p.221).

Development Status Products
Commercial

High-Efficiency MotorsCosts & Benefits

Parent Process: Electrical Motors
Energy Savings Potential

High efficiency motors have 20–30% less losses (IEA, 2007. p.221).

CO2 Emission Reduction Potential
Costs

High efficiency motors may cost 10–25% more. Depending on the hour of operation, extra costs can be recovered in less than three years (IEA, 2007. p.221)

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High-Efficiency MotorsSchematic

High-Efficiency Motors Publications

Energy-Efficiency Policy Opportunities for Electric Motor-Driven Systems

This paper presents the findings of the first global analysis of energy consumption in electric motor‐driven systems (EMDS) and the options to reduce it. It assesses the energy currently used by EMDS and the potential for energy savings, examines market barriers to the adoption of energy‐efficient solutions, and reviews current policy settings and outcomes. The report then proposes a comprehensive package of policy recommendations to help governments tap the huge potential for energy savings in EDMS.

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