Improved End-use Efficiency

Improving the end–use efficiency in an compressed air system offers opportunities for energy saving. Strategies for improving end–use efficiencies may include checking the pressure drop in end–use equipment against manufacturer specifications and and taking corrective action for excessive drop cases; installing a pressure regulator to otherwise unregulated end–users – such as engineered nozzles; turning idle equipment off, and; cutting air flow to equipment that is no longer in use.

Development Status Products
Commercial

Improved End-use EfficiencyCosts & Benefits

Parent Process: Compressed Air Systems
Energy Savings Potential

This measure is estimated to offer following improvement potentials:
• 12% for low efficiency base cases;
• 8% for medium efficiency base cases;
• 3% for high efficiency base cases.

Electrical and primary energy savings potential of this technology for diffierent countries is estimated as following (UNIDO, 2010): 

  Final (GWh/y) Primary (TJ/y)
US 2491 27361
Canada 658 8195
EU 2180 20491
Thailand 371 3740
Vietnam 206 2945
brazil 574 6404
CO2 Emission Reduction Potential

Total emisson reduction potential, as kt CO2/y for different countries are estimated as (UNIDO, 2010): 

US 1502
Canada 327
EU 951
Thailand 193
Vietnam 101
brazil 83

Costs

Estimated typical capital costs of this measure for different system sizes (S) are:
• US $1000  for S < 37 kW;
• US $1500 for 37 kW < S < 75 kW;
• US $2000 for 75 kW < S < 150 kW;
• US $7000 for 150 kW < S < 375 kW;
• US $10000 for 375 kW < S < 745 kW; (UNIDO, 2010)

Cost of conserved energy, expressed as US $/MWh-saved, in different countries are estimated as following: (UNIDO, 2010)

US 40.4
Canada 40.4
EU 44.1
Thailand 15.4
Vietnam 13.6
brazil 17.9

Parent Process:
Energy Savings Potential
CO2 Emission Reduction Potential

N/A

Costs
Parent Process:
Energy Savings Potential
CO2 Emission Reduction Potential

N/A

Costs

Improved End-use Efficiency Publications

Page Number: 

52-63