Process Control in Hot Strip Mill

Improved process control of the hot strip mill may lead to indirect energy savings through reduced product rejects, improved productivity, and reduced down time. The primary aim is to control the oxygen level, and hence optimize the combustion in the furnace, especially as the load of the furnace may vary over time. The savings depend on the load factor of the furnace and control strategies applied. A system installed at a mill in Belgium reduced the rejects from 1.5% to 0.2% and reduced the downtime from more than 50% of the time to 6% (Worrell et al., 2010. p. 101). 

Development Status Products
Commercial
steel

Process Control in Hot Strip MillCosts & Benefits

Parent Process: Rolling Mills
Energy Savings Potential

Estimated energy savings based on reducing rejects from 1.5% to 0.2% was 9% of fuel use, or approximately 0.3 GJ/t-product (US EPA, 2010. p.27). 

CO2 Emission Reduction Potential

Emissions are reduced by 15.1kg CO2/t-rolled steel.

Costs

The investment costs for one plant in Belgium was $3.6 million for a hot strip mill with a capacity of 2.8 million tons, $1.29/t-product. The payback time is estimated as 1.2 years (US EPA, 2010. p. 27).

Process Control in Hot Strip Mill Publications

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) energy guide, Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry, discusses energy efficiency practices and technologies that can be implemented in iron and steel manufacturing plants. This guide provides current real world examples of iron and steel plants saving energy and reducing cost and carbon dioxide emissions.

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