Reducing Unnecessary Demand

Leaks, sub-optimal flow patterns in equipment (e.g. heat exchangers), and inefficient end users consuming more fluid than what is needed will increase the demand in the system and increase energy consumption. In some cases, like leaks or inefficient end users, extra demand on the system may also translate into wastage of other valuable resources (e.g. heat energy or chemicals). It is, therefore, important to have a systemic approach to identify and eliminate unnecessary demand – for example through regular checks on the system.

Development Status Products
Commercial

Reducing Unnecessary DemandCosts & Benefits

Parent Process: Pump Systems
Energy Savings Potential

This measure is estimated to offer following improvement potentials (UNIDO, 2010):
• 3.5% for low efficiency base cases;
• 2.5% for medium efficiency base cases;
• 1% for high efficiency base cases;

Electrical and primary energy savings potential of this technology for diffierent countries is estimated as following (UNIDO, 2010): 

  Final* (GWh/y) Primary* (TJ/y)
US 1362 14950
Canada 406 5061
EU 977 9181
Thailand 105 1057
Vietnam 41 593
brazil 155 1731
CO2 Emission Reduction Potential

Total emission reduction potential, as kt CO2/y for different countries are estimated as (UNIDO, 2010): 

US 821
Canada 202
EU 426
Thailand 55
Vietnam 20
brazil 23

Costs

Estimated typical capital costs of this measure for different system sizes (S) are:
• US $1000  for S < 37 kW;
• US $1500 for 37 kW < S < 75 kW;
• US $2000 for 75 kW < S < 150 kW;
• US $2500 for 150 kW < S < 375 kW;
• US $3000 for 375 kW < S < 745 kW; (UNIDO, 2010)

Cost of conserved energy, expressed as US $/MWh-saved, in different countries are estimated as following (UNIDO, 2010):

US 84.1
Canada 81.4
EU 92.6
Thailand 30.6
Vietnam 27.5
brazil 36.2

Reducing Unnecessary Demand Publications

Page Number: 

39-48