Waste Heat Recovery in Sinter Plant

In a sinter plant, sensible heat can be recovered both from the exhaust gases of the sinter machine and the off-air of the sinter cooler.  Heat recovery can be in different forms:  

  • Hot air streams both from sinter machine and the sinter cooler can be used for the generation of steam with the installation of recovery boilers. This steam can be used to generate power or can be used as process steam. For inreased heat recovery efficiency, a high-temperature exhaust section should be separated from a low-temperature exhaust section and heat should be recovered only from high-temperature exhaust section.
  • Sinter machine exhaust can be re-circulated to the sinter machine, either after going through a heat recovery boiler or without it.  
  • Heat recovered from the sinter cooler can be recirculated to the sinter machine or can be used for preheating the combustion air in the ignition hood, for pre-heating of the raw mix to sinter machine.  It can also be used to produce hot water for district heating

This technology is regarded to have high application potential for China, India, and the US. 

Development Status Products
Commercial

Waste Heat Recovery in Sinter PlantCosts & Benefits

Parent Process: Sinter Plant
Energy Savings Potential

Japanese flag In Japanese plants 120 and 170 kg steam at 20 atm (equaling 0.34 GJ/t-sinter and 0.48 GJ/t-sinter) are recovered from sinter coolier and sinter machine proper, respectively. Electricity production from these units were 20kWh/t-sinter and 30 kWh/sinter, respectively (JASE-W, 2012)

Japanese flag

 Steam generation of 0.25 GJ/t-sinter is reported in other Japanese plants (NEDO, 2008)

EU Flag Fuel savings up to 0.55 GJ/t-sinter, and increased electricity generation of 1.4 kWh/t-sinter are reported from a  retrofitted plant in Netherlands (US EPA, 2010. p. 13)

CO2 Emission Reduction Potential

CO2 reductions will result due to reduced fuel consumption in the sinter machine and/or for electricity production. 

Costs

Reported retrofit capital costs vary between $3/t-sinter (APP, 2010. p.17) to $4.7/t-sinter (US EPA, 2010. p.13).

This technology is regarded to have payback times in the range of 3 to 5 years. 

Waste Heat Recovery in Sinter PlantSchematic

Waste Heat Recovery in Sinter Plant Publications

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) energy guide, Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry, discusses energy efficiency practices and technologies that can be implemented in iron and steel manufacturing plants. This guide provides current real world examples of iron and steel plants saving energy and reducing cost and carbon dioxide emissions.

Page Number: 

76

Global Warming Countermeasures: Japanese Technologies for Energy Savings / GHG Emissions Reduction

This revised 2008 version of the publication from New Energy and Industrial Technology Development of Japan includes information on innovative Japanese technologies for energy efficiency and for the reduction of COemissions.  

Page Number: 

65

The State–of-the-Art Clean Technologies (SOACT) for Steelmaking Handbook

 

The State–of-the-Art Clean Technologies (SOACT) for Steelmaking Handbook is developed as part of the Asia-Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate program and seeks to catalog the best available technologies and practices to save energy and reduce environmental impacts in the steel industry. Its purpose is to share information about commercialized or emerging technologies and practices that are currently available to increase energy efficiency and environmental performance. 

Page Number: 

17